Taking a Break

“Give me a break.” In the vernacular, ‘give me a break’ means “Oh, come on.” On the other hand, taking a break has no second meaning. Does that mean it’s more serious? Taking a break is so important that it is mandated by law to protect employees from being forced to work without eating or taking restroom stops.

Taking a Break from WritingTaking breaks makes us more productive. Coffee/tea breaks make life livable. Meditation breaks fill the screen of your mind with a pleasant je ne sais quoi. However it is positioned, taking a break helps balance body, mind and spirit.

One way of taking a break is to have someone do your work for you. Wow, wouldn’t that be cool? This strategy is usually a win-win. Why? The person doing your work often does it better because they don’t consider it work. They like it! And they’re often paid for it, which is good for the economy.

When we’re super busy, we like to convince ourselves that breaks are unnecessary. Been there, done that. However in my saner moments, I figure that if we weren’t supposed to take breaks, we wouldn’t have been designed to eat or to sleep.

“I think I can, I think I can,” says the little train filled with good intentions as it chugs up the steep hill. Of course we all think we can. We’re good. We’re professionals. We’re adults. Mostly, though, we’re invincible. But we’re not. Scientists know. The bad guys are certain: Starve people and keep them from sleeping, and they’ll crack.

Trend Alert: Taking breaks must be important: Google returned 729,000,000 results on the keyword string “taking a break.” This post will make at least 729,000,001! If those were seconds, the time to open up (without even reading) each of the separate results would require 12,150,000 minutes. Gee.  That’s 202,500 hours or 8,437 days. That comes out to 23 years. Taking a break is a very significant concept, evidently. We all need breaks, and more than one every twenty-three years.

Taking a break is essential. Standing up, taking a walk, stretching, reading a book for five or ten minutes. Meditating. Seeing a movie. Going out for a meal. Vacationing.

Breaks refresh, renew, revive, reinvigorate, restore, recharge, revitalize. We all know this. We just need to make time for it, schedule it on our calendars, find a break partner, and make taking a break a habit.

Or we’ll break.

B.C.

B.C. – You thought it wImageas that other thing. Nope. B.C. stands for Before Coffee. There is B.C., as in before one’s first cup in the morning. In fact, many people are not communicative B.C. There’s quite another graver discussion. It’s the B.C. marked by the Before [Ethiopian] Coffee that was discovered in the “nobody’s sure” year. Coffee was first mentioned in print in the tenth century, and so surely, this B.C. was centuries before drying and treating, technologies before roasting, and millennia before Fair Trade. There’s a before and an after for a lot of things. Before and after kids. Before and after work. Before and after life.

Before coffee, people relied on their own resources to perk up in the morning (yes, I said that), and to stay awake to get things done. Then there are people’s livelihoods (125 million people make their living off coffee and what did they do before that?), and we cannot forget Starbucks. Indeed. Before Coffee and After Coffee mark two huge schisms in the fabric of history.